3 Positions Against Prison

Text from back cover:

“One and a half centuries ago, slavery was abolished by the United States government. This followed an enormous social struggle over abolition–wars were fought between pro-slavery elements and abolitionist elements. There were slave revolts and armed uprisings. The government intervened. And the Thirteenth Amendment ever-so-neatly includes a loophole allowing for the enslavement of prisoners (“except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted”). Moreover, the economic system of chattel slavery was replaced with indentured servitude and industrial wage labor–which the Northern capitalists were struggling to proliferate. So today, we have slavery, although slavery has been abolished. The structures of society that required slaves have remained intact. And in one hundred years, prisons may be abolished, but we will still have prisons as long as capitalism remains intact.”

3 Positions Against Prison pdf

Against Prisons, Politics, Society

Text from the zine:

“There appears to be a trend in radical circles of distinguishing prisoners based on their so-called ‘crimes’, with the intent (conscious or not) to identify ‘political prisoners’ who, by virtue of their actions, are more deserving of support and solidarity. Prisoners who have been targeted by the state due to their political beliefs and/or actions are given special attention amongst radicals, while the rest of the prison population spending their days in a cage are often only an afterthought, used as a means to lend credibility to political ideology, or completely forgotten.

“This privileged and moralistic practice has invaded radical circles and creates a distinction between ‘political’ and ‘ordinary’ prisoner. Political prisoners are said to have been imprisoned unjustly, unlike the rest of the prison population. This can manifest either as an insistence of their innocence (as in the case of Mumia Abu-Jamal), or, in cases in which the prisoner has obviously broken the law, they are viewed as acting only in response to unjust laws or conditions (as in the case of Walter Bond). In both cases, their innocence is maintained.”

Against Prison Politics Society pdf

Attacking Prisons At Their Point of Production: A Brief Look at Militant Actions Against the Prison Industrial Complex

Attacking-Prisons-Point of Production pdf

Celling Black Bodies: Black Women in the Global Prison Industrial Complex


“Since the early 1990s, increases in the prison population in England and Wales have sparked a boom in prison construction, leading commentators to comment on ‘the largest prison building program since the middle of the 19th century’ (Morgan, 1999: 110). While women make up a small proportion of those incarcerated, their rates of imprisonment have multiplied faster than men’s, causing feminist activists to call for drastic measures to counter ‘the crisis in women’s prisons’. 4 Between 1985 and 1998, for example, the number of women in prison more than doubled, from 1,532 to 3,260 (Prison Reform Trust, 2000). The prison service has responded by contracting with private corporations to built and operate new prisons, and by rerolling men’s prisons for women. Recent government initiatives designed to slow the increase in the use of incarceration, such as Home Detention Curfews, have had little impact on the number of women sentenced to prison which continued to grow during the year to 2001 by 9%, compared to 2% for men.”

celling black bodies pdf

Defiant Hearts: Birth and The Prison Industrial Complex

Text from the zine:

“Within miles from birth centers and yoga studios, stand the extreme manifestations of dominance and forced subservience. United States prisons and jails are currently housing more than 170,000 mothers. 1 Approximately 2,000 babies are born to mothers in prison each year. 2 Behind prison walls, brilliant mothers and mothers-to-be are subdued through capitalist domination, discrimination, humiliation, forced servitude, and conditions utterly non-conducive to human survival – let alone healthy pregnancies – that would induce nightmares and post-traumatic stress within the psyches of any midwife. Since the conception of panopticon societies, pregnant mothers have been tortured, starved, murdered, torn from their child, and outright abused. To be a midwife is not merely to advocate for white women in the leftist co-op scene; a true midwife advocates for birth everywhere, especially where true care is most lacking. A true midwife seeks the absolute annihilation of all forms of anti-life* that restrict the beautiful act of birth.”

Birth and The Prison Industrial Complex pdf

Locked Up

Text from back cover:

“Prison is the most direct, brutal expression of power, and like power it must be destroyed, it cannot be abolished progressively. Anyone who thinks they can improve it now in order to destroy it in the future will forever be a captive of it. The revolutionary project of anarchists is to struggle along with the exploited and push them to rebel against all abuse and repression, so also against prison. What moves them is the desire for a better world, a better life with dignity and ethic, where economy and politics have been destroyed. There can be no place for prison in that world.”

locked up pdf

Survival in Solitary: A manual written by & for people living in control units

Text from back cover:

“The federal penitentiary in Marion, Illinois, went on permanent lock down in 1983. This created the first “control unit”. Now, in addition to the federal government, some forty states have built these “maxi-maxi” prisons — representations of the angry and cruel repression that grips our country today. Human beings are put alone in a small cell with double steel doors and no window for 23 hours a day. No program, no work, no education, meals alone, and maybe one hour by oneself in a bare dog-run outside. A religious task force calls such conditions psychological pain and agony tantamount to torture. It is torture. Here, now, in the following pages, people who are captives in these cells write about what goes on and how you can survive…”

Writing to Prisoners FAQ

An informational guide to writing and supporting prisoners.

writing_to_prisoners_FAQ pdf